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HPV is a group of viruses that can infect both males and females. There are more than 150 types of HPV, and each type is given a number. HPV is short for human papillomavirus. Some types of HPV cause warts on different parts of the body. Other types are more likely to cause cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus, or throat. You can get HPV by having sexual contact with someone who has it. You don’t have to have vaginal or anal sex to get HPV; skin-to-skin contact is enough. Most people with HPV don’t know they have it. That’s because there are usually no symptoms, or the symptoms go away on their own.

Symptoms of HPV

There are many different types of HPV, and not all of them cause health problems. In fact, most people who get HPV don’t even know they have it.

However, some types of HPV can cause health problems like genital warts or cancer.

If you have HPV, you might not have any symptoms. Or, you might have symptoms years after you’ve been infected.

Symptoms of HPV can include:

Genital warts: These are small bumps that can appear on the vulva, vagina, cervix, penis, scrotum, or anus. They can be raised or flat, single or multiple, small or large.

Cervical cancer: This is a rare but serious complication of HPV. Symptoms can include abnormal bleeding from the vagina, pain during sex, and pelvic pain.

Other cancers: HPV can also cause cancer of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, head and neck (throat, tongue, and tonsils). Symptoms can vary depending on the type of cancer.

How HPV Is Passed On

HPV is most commonly passed on through sexual contact, including both vaginal and anal sex. It can also be passed on through other forms of sexual activity, such as oral sex. HPV can be passed on even if there are no symptoms present. In fact, most people who have HPV don’t even know they have it.

HPV is a very common virus and is estimated to affect more than half of all sexually active people at some point in their lives. However, the vast majority of people who get HPV will never develop any symptoms or health problems from it.

There are many different types of HPV, and not all of them cause cancer. In fact, most types of HPV go away on their own without causing any problems. However, there are a few types of HPV that can lead to cancer, including cervical cancer, which is the most common type of cancer caused by HPV in women.

If you think you might have been exposed to HPV, it’s important to get tested so you can receive treatment if necessary. There is no cure for HPV, but there are treatments that can help people who have been infected with the virus.

Testing For HPV

It is important to get tested for HPV because it is a common infection that can cause cancer. There are many different types of HPV, and some can cause cancer of the cervix, vagina, vulva, anus, or oropharynx (back of the throat including the base of the tongue and tonsils).

You can get HPV by having sexual contact with someone who has it. HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active men and women will get it at some point in their lives.

If you are age 21 or older and have sex with someone who has HPV, you should get tested for it. You should also get tested if you are pregnant and have never been screened for HPV before.

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Treatment For HPV

There are a number of different ways to treat HPV, and the best method will depend on the individual case. In some cases, no treatment may be necessary if the HPV infection does not cause any symptoms or health problems. In other cases, treatments can help to clear the infection and reduce the risk of developing cancer or other health problems in the future.

Some common treatments for HPV include:

- Antiviral medications: These drugs can help to clear an active HPV infection and improve symptoms such as warts.

- Immunotherapy: This treatment uses drugs to stimulate the immune system and help fight off HPV infections.

- Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove warts or abnormal tissue changes caused by HPV.

How To Prevent HPV

There are a few things you can do to prevent HPV. First, get the HPV vaccine. It’s recommended for both boys and girls starting at age 11 or 12, but it’s also recommended for adults up to age 26 if they didn’t get the vaccine when they were younger. Second, use condoms every time you have sex. This will help protect you from HPV and other STDs. Third, don’t smoke. Smoking increases your risk of HPV-related cancer. fourth, limit your number of sexual partners. The more partners you have, the greater your risk of HPV infection.

Complications Of HPV If Left Untreated

If left untreated, HPV can lead to a number of complications, including:

Cervical cancer: Cervical cancer is the most common complication associated with HPV. It is estimated that HPV is responsible for approximately 70% of all cervical cancers.

Other cancers: HPV has also been linked to other types of cancer, including vaginal, vulvar, penile, anal, and oropharyngeal (throat) cancer.

Genital warts: Genital warts are another common complication associated with HPV. They are usually benign (non-cancerous), but can be uncomfortable and unsightly.


Confidential STD Testing | 10 Test Panel $139 | Local STD Testing in the US
Your results will not be reported to your insurance company and therefore will not be placed on your permanent medical records.