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Hepatitis A is a virus that can cause inflammation of the liver. It is spread through contact with contaminated food or water, and can also be spread through contact with an infected person. Symptoms of hepatitis A include fatigue, nausea, fever, and abdominal pain. The virus can be deadly in some cases, so it is important to be aware of the risks and how to protect yourself. In this blog post, we will discuss what you need to know about hepatitis A, including the risks, symptoms, and treatment options.

Symptoms Of Hepatitis A

Most people with hepatitis A have no symptoms, but some may experience fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, clay-colored stools, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). Symptoms usually appear 2-6 weeks after exposure to the virus and can last for several weeks.

If you think you may have hepatitis A, it is important to see a doctor right away for diagnosis and treatment.

How Hepatitis A Is Passed On

Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). It can be spread through contact with contaminated food or water, or from person to person. The virus is found in the stool of infected people and is usually spread through close contact with someone who has the virus.

Hepatitis A can also be spread through sexual contact, sharing needles, or being in close contact with someone who has the virus. The virus can also be spread from mother to child during childbirth.

Testing For Hepatitis A

There are a few different ways that you can test for Hepatitis A. The most common way is through a blood test. This can be done at your doctor’s office or at a local health clinic. You may also be able to get a free Hepatitis A test through your state or local health department.

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Treatment For Hepatitis A

There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. However, there are measures you can take to ease your symptoms and prevent the virus from spreading.

If you have hepatitis A, you should:

  • rest and get plenty of sleep
  • drink lots of fluids, especially water
  • avoid alcohol
  • eat a healthy diet
  • take over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) for pain or discomfort

If your liver is damaged, you may need to be hospitalized so that you can be monitored and receive supportive care. In some cases, a liver transplant may be necessary.

How To Prevent Getting Hepatitis A

The best way to prevent hepatitis A is to get vaccinated. The hepatitis A vaccine is safe and effective, and it’s the only way to prevent the disease. All children should get the hepatitis A vaccine as part of their routine childhood immunizations. Adults at risk for hepatitis A can also get vaccinated.

You can also help prevent hepatitis A by practicing good hygiene, including washing your hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the restroom, changing diapers, or handling money. Avoiding close contact with people who are infected with HAV, such as sharing utensils or eating food that has been handled by someone with HAV, can also help reduce your risk of infection.

Complications Of Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A can cause a number of complications, including:

• Fatigue
• Weakness
• Loss of appetite
• Nausea and vomiting
• Abdominal pain
• Dark urine
• Clay-colored stools
• Joint pain
• Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)

If left untreated, hepatitis A can lead to liver failure. In severe cases, it can be fatal.

Find more information here.


Confidential STD Testing | 10 Test Panel $139 | Local STD Testing in the US
Your results will not be reported to your insurance company and therefore will not be placed on your permanent medical records.